1. Berried treasure: Five shrubs you shouldn't be without

    Bright and beautiful berries, five of the best for October

    Berries are just one of the 'berry' best features of the time of year.  Don't miss the spectacle that these bring in autumn. They are not only a feast for the birds but for the eyes too. In fact, rather than lamenting the passing of warmer times we really do need to appreciate what's out there before the little beaks nick all the glorious sights of the season! Which are the very best berries to enjoy right now? Read more
  2. Why you should be scared in October

    Scared to enter the season of spirits? Here's how to cope with the dark forces that are coming.

    Halloween is coming. But what does it all mean? It's all part of the dark season in which witches, ghosts and flickering lights are upon us! The gloomy evenings are already a-glow with signs that there’s something spooky about to happen and feeling scpooked is all part of the entertainment. Read more
  3. Cool Heuchera plants for a shady site: bright and beautiful in autumn and winter.

    Bright and beautiful Heucheras set shady spaces alight in all seasons

    Do you have spaces in your garden that are a problem when it comes to planting? Many of these might involve shade - particularly dry shade under trees. This is great! Every negative can be turned into a supreme positive if you look for it and this is where HEUCHERA take centre stage. The rosette-forming foliage plants are as bright and beautiful as any shrub or perennial with flowers. What's more, they can perform all year round too, making them a magnificent choice for so many sites. Heuchera can set your garden on fire if you let them.
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  4. The light bulb moment: complete this garden task within the next two weeks!

    Don't let the light bulbs effect pass you by. Here's your Eureka moment to help stave off depression. 

    Why is this particular week said to be one of the busiest of the gardening year? It’s all about bulbs! Now that autumn has officially arrived, (it's the equinox on Friday 22 September) you can plant your little spheres of energy and be not only comforted, but positively enthused because you are planting the concept of JOY! This might not seem such a big deal but you will be amazed at the difference it makes to your inner soul, particularly if you suffer from depression. Which, incidentally, affects around one in six people at any given time. Read more
  5. 7 plants to make a rainbow garden in August and September

    7 Rainbow plants for a glowing late summer garden

    Perhaps, by now, you are assuming that the best part of summer is over. But in fact, sometimes September brings the very best weather, coupled with interesting light. The brightness of hot sunny days in mid-summer makes gardens appear to be ‘washed out’ because the sun is so high and light travels through the shortest possible path through the atmosphere.  Late summer, however, is often a real feast for the eyes. Read more
  6. Looking good in summer: 10 hot perennial plants that are drought-tolerant

    Is it fun in the hot sun?

    Is the hot summer all but a dream or will there be more good weather to come? Who knows, in this green and pleasant land, if and when sunshine and warmth will be with us. For most of us, a hot spell is a blessing. But if you were on the continent earlier in the month you would have experienced heatwave Lucifer. It has seen temperatures soar to over 40 degrees C. and caused havoc, including wild fires, drought and even death. The affected countries included Greece, Italy, France, Spain and Croatia, which were all issued with the highest grade ‘red’ warning from European weather hub Meteoalarm.

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  7. Deliciously tempting: 10 unusual edible plants to try growing at home

    Grow your own unusual edible plants

    grow your own, grow, vegetables, fruit, garden, allotment, soil, eat, produce, gardening, Grow your own edible plants! But why stop at the predictable produce when you can grow unusual fruit and vegetables too? The ‘grow your own’ habit is growing! Around one in three people are now thought to grow some sort of edible plants, from simple windowsill herbs through to full ’10-pole’ allotment produce. It seems that people love being able to control which fertilisers and chemicals, or lack of them, go into the food they eat. The desire to eat organic food seems to be an expanding one as more and more people are realising that ‘we are what we eat’. Read more
  8. Lavender, lavender everywhere, and even a drop to drink!

    What are those  Lavender fields forever, and how do we use this herb?

    Lavender is considered by most of us to be a quintessentially English sub-shrub, that we love to see and smell.  But did you know that Lavandula is actually a Mediterranean plant that was brought over to Britain by the Romans? This was hailed as a great healing plant because it possesses antiseptic qualities. In fact it was used to make a washing fluid which kept clothes smelling fresh during Roman times. Indeed ‘lavare’ means ‘to wash’ in Latin. Read more
  9. 15 plants that will help to repel bugs in your garden

    Bugged by bugs in your garden? Here’s 15 plants that can keep biting insects at bay.

    The summer, for all its joy and wonder, can pack a bit of a bite when it comes to insects. Even if you don’t live in the wilds of Bonnie Scotland, there are plenty of flying perils – especially around the time of evening barbecues. Most of us are a bit wary of applying chemicals to body or garden in order to keep bugs at bay. But there are other ways of fending off the mosquitoes, midges and other creatures that like to snack on human flesh! Read more
  10. What's changed in 50 years in our constantly evolving gardens? 10 changes that gardeners have witnessed.

    10 gardening habits that have changed over the last 50 years.

    A lot has changed in 50 years. Did your granny or perhaps great granny like to see the soil between the plants and expect garden shrubs to stay in neat little mounds? She probably expected the edges to be trimmed by shears rather than strimmer and enjoyed the sight of freshly dug soil. Hedges needed to be neatly trimmed at all times; weeds must be immediately banished to the compost heap and neatness should reign supreme. Read more