1. Make the most of vibrant colour in the autumn garden

    In autumn, many things in the garden can be tidied away, cut back and neatened. Or can they - does thismean it's all over for the year? Do we need to see bare soil and pruned back stems?

    A few decades ago, this was the aspiration but now it's just not the thing to do. Garden minibeasts and birds love to scratch around and feast upon the stems and seeds that autumn brings. There's so much happening outdoors in October and beyond. It would be a shame to miss it. There is sometimes even an Indian summer which can be one of the best times of year.  We Brits are often prepared to let the glory of autumn slip away without even a glance.

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  2. Why you should make the most of an Indian summer

    We know the phrase and we always hope that the autumn season will bring one. But what on earth is an Indian summer and why do people crave to get one? Firstly, there's all that beautiful light that results from autumn sunshine. It creatures wonderful colours as well as warmth. ‍But where did the expression originate?

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  3. Harvest happiness! How to manage your vegetable and fruit glut

    Anyone with a kitchen garden or allotment should be enjoying a harvest glut in September. Apples are ripe for plucking, courgettes are still coming, onions are ready for drying, tomatoes are ripening on the vine and potatoes are inviting you to dig for their delicious treasure. There are still runner beans hiding amongst the climbing green foliage, autumn-fruiting raspberries and tayberries are luscious, blackberries taste beautiful and beetroot is bursting from the soil. But how do you cope with a glut of wonderful produce?

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  4. The best bulbs to plant in autumn, here's a recipe for spring flowering success

    Enjoy our recipe for spring flowering success  - here's our top six bulbs to plant now

    The long, hot summer is gradually fading away, making September and October the perfect time of year to plan a spring flowering display. There's just one simple rule to follow:  plant bountiful bulbs! Bulbs are now available just about everywhere and they present an uplifting opportunity to think about new beginnings. Those spherical powerhouses will establish themselves in your warm soil, ready to burst into new life as soon as the season dictates. Read more
  5. Plants that can cope with extremes of weather. Living on the edge

    The right plant in the right place is the thing to do. Choose appropriate plants for a dry garden as it's possible for them to survive without extra water. And use plants to soak up water in flood and waterlogged zones.

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  6. Keep cool in the garden and seek out the shade

    Head for the shade during sizzling summer days

    There are many ways to try keeping cool during hot, dry and sunny weather. Some are obvious and others, less so. Garden umbrellas are probably the first line of defence. Put up several before the sun rises, and not only will the shade provide a mini-refuge, but the air flow around the umbrella will create a little breeze too. You don’t need a fancy stand, some garden parasols, such as the Eazy Shade from Cave Innovations, come with multi-function clips and clamps so that they can attach to chairs and tables. Read more
  7. Horseflies, mosquitoes and things that bite in the garden. Help!

    No flies on me (normally), but how can I keep horseflies away?

    The hot, dry summer provides ideal conditions for many things. Some plants love the weather, including cacti; succulents; alpines; ornamental grasses such as Stipa gigantea; Agarves; Bougainvillea; Portulaca; Oleander; poppy; lavender and most silvery or furry-leafed plants. Read more
  8. 12 ways to plug the summer flowering gap

    Why is your garden bare, dry and jaded? Here's some tips to perk up your plot in July and August

    As much as gardeners tend to love summer (because they can spend all those luscious daylight hours outdoors), the time is approaching when garden beauty starts to dwindle.  Many spaces begin to look barren, with dry soils and parched plants without much in the way of colour. What can you do this month to perk up your plot? Read more
  9. Warm weather and water in the garden

    Perfect partners: warm weather and water in the garden. Why have a pond?

    When the sun’s shining we are all drawn naturally to water. Most people can’t resist dipping fingers into a cool pond and the sound of trickling and sprinkling attract people like a magnet. There’s a practical side to adding a pond to a garden too. Water, particularly if it’s moving, cools the air around it. Tempted to add a pond to your garden? DO IT! Read more
  10. It's high pollen count time, what can you do about hay fever and allergies?

    You can’t hide from seasonal pollen. It’s a plant’s method of fertilisation and without it, many will die out. Around one fifth of the UK population has some sort of allergy or intolerance and a reaction to pollen is one of the most common problems. Hay fever; as many sufferers know, is more than just an irritation. It can cause numerous debilitating effects including sneezing, blocked nose, watery eyes, lethargy, headaches, sore throat, coughing and even asthma. There's no doubt that allergies pose a big problem for sufferers.

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