1. What is mycorrhizal fungi and why do I need it in my garden?

    No doubt you’ve heard the term ‘mycorrhizal fungi’, but do you know why you need it in your garden? Especially during autumn, winter and early spring when you might be considering doing some bare root planting.

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  2. Pick of the best flowering perennials and shrubs for spring and early summer

    Fill it with flowers!

    There’s no shortage of blooms at this time of year, and with the RHS Chelsea Flower Show looming (commencing 21 May), focus is firmly on flowers in the garden during this wonderful season. But there are many people who look wistfully from the side-lines, wondering why their own gardens aren’t showing such splendour. So let’s take a look at the best flowering shrubs and perennials for a marvellous May. If you set yourself a target to plant one specimen each month, choosing something that flowers in that particular month, your garden would gradually fill with flowering interest throughout the year.

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  3. HOORAY for Heucheras, the groundcover plants with pizzazz!

    Groundcover needn't be boring

    Heuchera are the eye-candy of the low-level planting storey and these stunners have enjoyed a gradual rise in the popularity stakes over the last few years. There are now very few gardens that haven’t managed to find room for this colourful foliage plant. It’s not difficult to see why, because Heucheras are capable of providing year-round colour and low-level interest. (Meaning a spectacle close to the ground rather than only mildly exciting.)

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  4. Make the most of vibrant colour in the autumn garden

    In autumn, many things in the garden can be tidied away, cut back and neatened. Or can they - does thismean it's all over for the year? Do we need to see bare soil and pruned back stems?

    A few decades ago, this was the aspiration but now it's just not the thing to do. Garden minibeasts and birds love to scratch around and feast upon the stems and seeds that autumn brings. There's so much happening outdoors in October and beyond. It would be a shame to miss it. There is sometimes even an Indian summer which can be one of the best times of year.  We Brits are often prepared to let the glory of autumn slip away without even a glance.

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  5. What is lavender? 6 reasons to love this aromatic subshrub

    Of all the scented, colourful and varied aromatic plants that you might choose to place in a sunny garden, Lavender is just about tops for popularity. It's small enough to squeeze into a courtyard, a balcony and even a window box. It will give you far more value than just about any other plant because it can be enjoyed in at least six different ways...

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  6. Is your garden bare? 12 ways to plug the summer flowering gap

    'My garden has no colour or flowers during mid to late summer'. Is this you? If so, you might want to plug your summer flowering gap. It's easier than you might think. Here's 12 suggestions to help you fill the garden with colour:

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  7. If I put climbing plants on my walls and fences, will they do any damage?

    Do climbing plants damage vertical walls and fences?

    As the RHS Chelsea Flower Show gradually fades into memory, most garden lovers are experiencing an emotional high. The boost of enthusiasm generated by what might be the greatest flower show on earth will remain long after the gardens have been dismantled and hopefully re-homed. So, now’s the time to act in order to make hopes and dreams turn into reality. Early summer is just about here, and glorious gardens await your attention! Read more
  8. Palm trees for indoor and out. How can they help us to feel good in the UK?

    Palm trees are good for the health, and boost the spirits too. But what is it about palm trees that give so much pleasure? Here is a selection of four hardy palms for UK gardens and three excellent palm varieties for indoors too. Just be aware that some palm trees are difficult to source due to plant passport requirements to help guard against pests and diseases.

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  9. Fashion versus tradition in the garden. Are you keeping up?

    Should you keep up with fashion trends in the garden?

    You might not associate plants and gardens as being subject to fashion, but they are indeed. For instance, you can date many gardens by looking at their planting style or choice of hard landscaping materials. Crazy paving came into being as an inexpensive method of hard surfacing that used broken or incomplete pieces of paving, with mortar being used to fill the gaps. The craze for crazy paving caught on and during the 1960s and 70s it was everywhere. This style of paving might not still be in fashion, but it is still acceptable, but it will always have an air of ‘age’ about it. However, replace the mortar filling with low planting of Thyme or other such creeping beauties that will allow a softening of the ‘look’ and it is bang up to date. Older styles can be updated and adapted to the modern age with great effect. Read more
  10. 10 Plants for dark and shady places

    Plants for shade, here's 10 plants for dark and gloomy places

    In some respects, plants are rather like people. But far less vocal. Many British folk seem to be obsessed by the weather and a multitude feel unable to contend with rain, gloomy skies, shade, or indeed, winter in general. Their inability to cope could be compared to the way that plants behave when they are placed within an environment that is alien to them. Place a sun-loving succulent in a damp, gloomy corner and it will fade away. Bright and beautiful flowers in the garden often need sunshine. The same principle applies indoors. The position of house plants needs to be matched to their temperament if they are to thrive.  In fact, the most common cause of death to house plants is over-watering, followed by lack of light. Read more
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