1. Five stress busting plants to improve health and wellbeing

    Health and wellbeing is important and plants can be our stress-busting friends

    We all know that plants are good for us, but some are even better than others. Both indoors and out, there are plants that aid health and wellbeing. Indeed, the act of caring for plants also has a positive, stress busting effect on the soul.

    Here’s five plant favourites for your good health: 

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  2. Japanese Knotweed: is it as bad as you think? How to deal with this pernicious weed.

    What can you do about Japanese knotweed in your garden?

    Who would have thought that the presence of a humble plant could affect house prices and sales? When it comes to Japanese knotweed, it seems that everyone fears this beast. But is its reputation well-deserved or are we over-reacting? Japanese knotweed. These are two words that strike fear into the hearts of homeowners!

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  3. How to enjoy your 'normal' garden rather than wish for a Chelsea Flower Show spectacle

    Out of reach for most: the expense of a garden makeover

    During RHS Chelsea Flower Show, it’s both likely and understandable that the majority of people either visiting or watching the show won’t ever own a garden that could be viewed as anywhere near similar to the gardens on display. This could feel a bit depressing for many who would like to emulate the sights they enjoy at Chelsea. Few people have enough funds to redevelop their plots to the tune of hundreds of thousands of pounds. The Main Avenue gardens at Chelsea can easily cost £250,000. For a garden that lasts barely a week.

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  4. Pick of the best flowering perennials and shrubs for spring and early summer

    Fill it with flowers!

    There’s no shortage of blooms at this time of year, and with the RHS Chelsea Flower Show looming (commencing 21 May), focus is firmly on flowers in the garden during this wonderful season. But there are many people who look wistfully from the side-lines, wondering why their own gardens aren’t showing such splendour. So let’s take a look at the best flowering shrubs and perennials for a marvellous May. If you set yourself a target to plant one specimen each month, choosing something that flowers in that particular month, your garden would gradually fill with flowering interest throughout the year.

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  5. HOORAY for Heucheras, the groundcover plants with pizzazz!

    Groundcover needn't be boring

    Heuchera are the eye-candy of the low-level planting storey and these stunners have enjoyed a gradual rise in the popularity stakes over the last few years. There are now very few gardens that haven’t managed to find room for this colourful foliage plant. It’s not difficult to see why, because Heucheras are capable of providing year-round colour and low-level interest. (Meaning a spectacle close to the ground rather than only mildly exciting.)

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  6. Top 10 perennials, which is your favourite for the spring and summer garden?

    How could you not be excited by April and May in the garden...

    when the earth beneath your feet is erupting into a growing frenzy? The garden is springing into glorious life! But as the spring-flowering bulbs give us their best burst of colour, there's something even better following behind. What are these masters of disguise, and which might you want to select for your own garden?

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  7. Keep cool in the garden and seek out the shade

    Head for the shade during sizzling summer days

    There are many ways to try keeping cool during hot, dry and sunny weather. Some are obvious and others, less so. Garden umbrellas are probably the first line of defence. Put up several before the sun rises, and not only will the shade provide a mini-refuge, but the air flow around the umbrella will create a little breeze too. You don’t need a fancy stand, some garden parasols, such as the Eazy Shade from Cave Innovations, come with multi-function clips and clamps so that they can attach to chairs and tables. Read more
  8. It's high pollen count time, what can you do about hay fever and allergies?

    Do you suffer from allergies such as hay fever or asthma?

    You can’t hide from seasonal pollen. It’s a plant’s method of fertilisation and without it, many will die out. Around one fifth of the UK population has some sort of allergy or intolerance and a reaction to pollen is one of the most common problems. Hay fever; as many sufferers know, is more than just an irritation. It can cause numerous debilitating effects including sneezing, blocked nose, watery eyes, lethargy, headaches, sore throat, coughing and even asthma. There's no doubt that allergies pose a big problem for sufferers. Read more
  9. Hurrah for Hellebores, six reasons to want some of these winter wonders

    The Hellebore season is almost here. At the dawn of the new year, these sturdy perennials begin to shine. Despite their fragile appearance, they can withstand just about anything that nature brings. Snow, ice, rain, they just don't really care. What will damage them is too much direct sunlight (hardly likely in January). Position them in shady places so they are protected during the hotter parts of the year. They also won't enjoy sitting in a permanent bog. But apart from that, they are dynamite!

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  10. 10 Plants for dark and shady places

    Plants for shade, here's 10 plants for dark and gloomy places

    In some respects, plants are rather like people. But far less vocal. Many British folk seem to be obsessed by the weather and a multitude feel unable to contend with rain, gloomy skies, shade, or indeed, winter in general. Their inability to cope could be compared to the way that plants behave when they are placed within an environment that is alien to them. Place a sun-loving succulent in a damp, gloomy corner and it will fade away. Bright and beautiful flowers in the garden often need sunshine. The same principle applies indoors. The position of house plants needs to be matched to their temperament if they are to thrive.  In fact, the most common cause of death to house plants is over-watering, followed by lack of light. Read more
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