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gardening

  • Gardening – the ultimate green and sustainable occupation. Or is it?

    How sustainable is your garden habit?

    As part of nature, plants themselves are perfectly balanced. They grow organically, they bear fruit and seed and some of this is eaten by animals and humans. Eventually they die and return everything and more back to the soil. Plants in their natural surroundings are in harmony with nature. Plant matter which is farmed or grown for pleasure can eventually be composted and fully re-used. Even water that is used to help plants thrive is recyclable in terms of photosynthesis, evaporation and rain. Continue reading

  • Avoid making these 8 gardening mistakes in your patch of paradise

    There are many common gardening mistakes that people make in their outdoor spaces, resulting in inconvenience; increased workload or even major problems for them later. As in general life, it’s a good idea to think before you act! Timely effort, planning and paying attention to detail is the way to go.

    Avoid these gardening errors - your future will be both easier and more pleasurable:

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  • How to make a great hanging basket display this spring

    Want to create an amazing hanging basket display this year? It's not difficult, provided you follow simple advice:

    The sight of a tumbling cascade of summer colour, dangling in the air, is a joy to behold. The best thing about hanging baskets is the fact that you can achieve them just about anywhere. All you need is a sunny wall or a strong fence post together with a hanging hook or bracket, a basket, liner, compost – oh, and plants, of course.

    So, what’s the secret of a great display?

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  • Once upon a garden, a story of everyday town folk

    Once upon a time there was a modern house with a rectangular garden

    One day, during winter, new owners moved into the property and they took many days, weeks and months to decorate; put up shelves, purchase new furniture and technology and play with soft furnishings like children with Barbie dolls. When visitors came to the house, they were taken into many different rooms. “What do you think of the colour; the style; the ornaments; the furniture?” asked the owners? They drank tea (and sometimes wine or beer, depending on the time of day and the mode of transport). The new owners, let’s call them Adam and Annie Poppins, were very happy.

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  • What can I do in the garden in March?

    March is a great month in which to get to grips with the garden

    If you have a growing schedule, there will be a lot of green dots for March. This really is the month in which to get organised outdoors if you want to achieve the very best during the forthcoming gardening season. Let’s look at some gardening tasks and fire up enthusiasm for everything to come:
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  • How realistic are New Year's Resolutions? Here's 5 top tips for success.

    How many people break their New Year's Resolutions?

    Are we setting ourselves up for failure when we make those New Year’s Resolutions? It seems that around 88% of people fail to achieve their goals, and by the end of February a high proportion can’t even remember what they resolved to change in their lives.  Here are the reasons why we do it and five top tips for success: Continue reading

  • Improve your mental health this November, it might be easier than you think

    You can improve your mental health with these two natural chemicals

    Did you know that there are two naturally-produced chemicals that are largely responsible for our mental health and emotional wellbeing? There are good reasons why gardening is good for you, not least the hormones that gardens help you to produce.

    A young man who looks unwell and depressed. mental health, depression, unhappy, sad, ill health, unwell, ill, gardening, how to improve your mentalhealth. Latest figures show that one in four people is likely to be affected by mental health problems. Around 450 million people currently suffer, therefore it is one of the leading causes of ill-health and disability worldwide.

     

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  • Why is indoor gardening good for you?

    How to cope with dark evenings and why indoor gardening is good for you. 

    The clocks are about to turn, the fires can be lit and it’s time to enjoy cosy evenings indoors rather than out. There’s no reason to abandon your outdoor space, however. There are plenty of ways in which to enjoy indoor gardening whilst still appreciating your autumn and winter garden on the other side of the window pane. One of the most rewarding things you can do is to give yourself the visual treat of a little lighting in the garden. You don’t want to flood the space with artificial brightness, however. This disturbs the natural world and confuses wildlife.

    How to light your garden

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  • Which ornamental grasses are right for my garden?

    Grasses: the swaying stars of the autumn border

    Every season brings its own garden wonders and, apart from the awe-inspiring colour of leaves, ornamental grasses are the stars of the moment. In fact, their moment lasts a long time. Grass seed heads and flower heads look beautiful for months. They are more durable than most flowers and certainly delight the senses for a longer period of time than the beautiful show of autumn foliage. But did you realise that there are several different categories of ornamental grasses? Each grows into a form that is distinctly different from others. Some are more suitable for gardens than others, especially small spaces.

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  • Is it time to think outside of the box, Buxus sempervirens?

    Box blight and box moth are devastating tiny hedges and stylish topiary. What can you do about it?

    Are there alternatives to box, the highly popular small-leaved evergreen, Buxus sempervirens?

    Not every case of so-called box blight is actually that. Did you know that Buxus sempervirens is also affected by another little demon called Box tree moth? It can defoliate the shrub quite quickly, and is often first noticed as fine, webbed strands within which the moth larvae feeds. They subsequently develop into hungry green caterpillars.

    buxus sempervirens, buxus, box, box hedging, topiary, box blight, box tree moth, box caterpillar, formal gardens, hedging, Buxus has been used for topiary and detailed hedging for centuries because its small evergreen foliage responds well to clipping.

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