1. Where can I go today? Here's 12 garden suggestions

     

    Visit a garden in August. That's where you can go today!

    Where can you go today? Did you know that 2016 is Visit England’s Year of the English Garden? August is in full swing and there’s a garden open every day of the week. Come rain or shine, there’s always something to see. From gardens that swing open their gates as part of the ever popular National Gardens Scheme (NGS), through to charity event openings. Then of course there's the RHS, historic houses and National Trust gardens too. Having a day out has never been such fun! Here's some suggestions for places you can go today, tomorrow and for the rest of the summer! Read more
  2. Natural or designed? 6 ways to recognise the English Landscape Style

    The English Landscape Style

    One might view a typical English landscape and assume it is natural. But is it? This is a year in which birthday congratulations are owed to a remarkable landscape architect. Capability Brown actually helped to create the English landscape as we recognise it today. He moulded hills and valleys into the archetypal  scenery that we believe to be natural. Gatton Park, Capability Brown, landscape, design, architect, garden, 300th, birthday Gatton Park near Reigate is a beautiful Capability Brown landscape near Reigate in Surrey. Read more
  3. Six reasons to look upwards. Vertical space in the garden

    Think vertical. It adds a new dimension to your garden

    If there’s one aspect of a garden which is often ignored, it’s the vertical. This isn’t vital in large gardens where trees and larger structures provide plenty going on in an upwards sense. But in a small space it is foolish not to take advantage of the exciting opportunity to branch towards the sky. Read more
  4. Gardens styles: the history of design in outdoor spaces

    A potted history of gardens: 12 styles of garden design 

    We have been in love with gardens for thousands of years. The history of outdoor design is a story that spans the ages right back to prehistoric times. Details of historic garden design would fill volumes, but for convenience this can be simplified into 12 main categories. Read more
  5. Creepy Crawlies: things that chomp in the night (and day).

    Creepy things that chomp. Six reasons to let them.

    Creepy crawlies in the garden. What do you do when you see caterpillars chomping away on your beloved plants? Squash them/throw them over into the neighbour’s garden? Photograph them? Applaud and show the children? Clearly, nobody wants the cabbage white larvae eating their brassica. Read more
  6. Time for contemplation...resurrect your garden this Easter

    Eight garden thoughts to contemplate as Easter approaches

    It’s almost Easter! A mellow holiday weekend during which time you might want to contemplate the shape of things to come in your garden. This is the start of the outdoor season and it's a great time to organise your space. Does your garden need a makeover? In the same way that new beginnings commence at Easter, you can breathe new life and ideas into your garden. Egg, Easter, spring, chick, garden, design, outdoors, plants New beginnings: Easter is a time for fresh ideas and it's the start of the outdoor season. Read more
  7. Plants on Acid. The 'high' that's entirely legal

    Garden plants on acid, and it's all legal!

    Some plants just love to take a trip on acid. And this is not something that attracts disapproval. In fact there are whole families of plants that are on a permanent ‘high’, because that is exactly where they originate from. Rhododendrons, for example, like to live on steep slopes that lead down into valleys in the Himalayas and south eastern Tibet. Read more
  8. Why do we love Japanese garden design?

    Look at a Japanese 'Zen' garden and you feel a comforting wave of calm wash over your soul. Why?

    It's all about a spiritual sense of place that is historically linked to the Japanese culture. Garden design in Japan is connected to the philosophy and religion of the country. Buddhism, Taoism and Shinto all bring a spiritual sense to a garden. This encourages people to be peaceful and meditative. Read more
Page