1. How to reap your autumn garden harvest and enjoy throughout winter

    Harvest happiness! What an amazing time of year. The trees are gradually beginning to transform  during October and the colours within the vegetable garden are golden. Garden harvests are being reaped and those with the time and inclination are researching recipes for preserving.

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  2. 3 easy steps to the 'no dig method' of gardening and why it can work for you

    The 'no dig method' of gardening is a growing trend, try it before the main vegetable planting season arrives

    So, here we are, more than three quarters of the way through January already. Grow your own enthusiasts and those with an allotment will already be champing at the bit, eager to start sowing and growing. Let’s look at what you can be getting on with right now. It’s a great month for preparing the plot. For some, this means digging. This helps to bury weeds and loosen the soil. Digging the vegetable garden or allotment in order to prepare for spring  growing and sowing is the traditional way to go about things, but with the benefit of ecological understanding together with science, it might not be necessary.

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  3. Harvest happiness! How to manage your vegetable and fruit glut

    It's harvest time, but what can you do with excess produce from the garden?

    Anyone with a kitchen garden or allotment should be enjoying a harvest glut right now. The apples are ripe for plucking, courgettes are still coming, onions are ready for drying, tomatoes are ripening on the vine and potatoes are inviting you to dig for their delicious treasure. There are still runner beans hiding amongst the climbing green foliage, autumn-fruiting raspberries and tayberries are luscious, blackberries taste beautiful and beetroot is bursting from the soil. If you’re lucky enough to have a fig tree, be sure to collect your fruit by the beginning of October as they won’t tolerate frost. There are late-season plums to harvest too, and damsons which can be picked while slightly unripe as you’ll be cooking them. apples, harvest, apple picking, picking apples, rosy fruits, fruit, september in the garden, october in the garden, glut of fruit, kitchen garden, perfectplants.co.uk, It's apple harvest time! But what can you do with all those luscious fruits?

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  4. Five best herbs and vegetables for the kitchen garden

    Ready, steady, grow your own! Here’s five of the best for the kitchen garden

    So, the major growing season is upon us and danger of frost will soon be a thing of the past. There’s no time to waste down on the vegetable plot and the sooner you start growing, the faster your crops will be making their way to the kitchen table. Are you a newbie to kitchen garden vegetable growing? Here’s our selection of five easy crops that can be sown and grown now. Read more
  5. It's never too late... or too early... to dip a toe into the allotment

    Ever fancied having an allotment? Why it's becoming a growing trend

    Have you ever fancied having an allotment? Now’s a great time to get involved in your local community growing area, should you be lucky enough to have one. It seems that ‘grow your own’ has enjoyed a surge in popularity over the past decade or so as people appreciate the value of organically-grown, top quality produce together with the enormous satisfaction that can be gained from the entire growing process. Read more
  6. 11 unusual fruit crosses that will make your taste buds quiver

    Plumcot anyone? Here’s 11 unusual fruit trees and bushes for the experimental gardener

    What’s with the weird and unusual fruit? Perhaps you have tasted some of the many strange fruit crosses that are now available. Are you tempted to plant your own unusual fruit tree or bush? If so, February is a great time to plant. You might even find bare root plants to keep your costs down. These curiously addictive fruit crosses are generally created from hybrids rather than selective breeding through genetic engineering of DNA. In other words, the new fruits arise from cross-pollination of two plants from the same species or genus. Here’s a round-up of the most commonly found ‘alternative’ fruit crosses. You can decide for yourself whether the tree or bush is the right one for you. Read more
  7. Why choose a crab apple tree for your garden?

    Here's six reasons why a crab apple could be the tree for you!

    If you have the desire to plant a tree in your garden, and, let’s face it, there’s are fewer more rewarding tasks, why should you consider the humble crab apple? The retort is “why not?”. There are so many benefits to this tree that it soon becomes obvious: you’ve just got to have one!

    Here's six wonderful features of a tree that's so easy to please:

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  8. Why you should be scared in October

    Scared to enter the season of spirits? Here's how to cope with the dark forces that are coming.

    Halloween is coming. But what does it all mean? It's all part of the dark season in which witches, ghosts and flickering lights are upon us! The gloomy evenings are already a-glow with signs that there’s something spooky about to happen and feeling scpooked is all part of the entertainment. Read more
  9. Six ways to make yourself smile - even if you don't feel like it!

    Smile! What is it that makes us happy?

    Have you ever noticed how some people seem to smile a lot? How does this make you feel?  Perhaps you are envious or maybe you think they are foolish. You might not even have noticed that  there's a whole heap of people out there who look happy most of the time. Are you one of them? Read more
  10. Deliciously tempting: 10 unusual edible plants to try growing at home

    Grow your own unusual edible plants

    grow your own, grow, vegetables, fruit, garden, allotment, soil, eat, produce, gardening, Grow your own edible plants! But why stop at the predictable produce when you can grow unusual fruit and vegetables too? The ‘grow your own’ habit is growing! Around one in three people are now thought to grow some sort of edible plants, from simple windowsill herbs through to full ’10-pole’ allotment produce. It seems that people love being able to control which fertilisers and chemicals, or lack of them, go into the food they eat. The desire to eat organic food seems to be an expanding one as more and more people are realising that ‘we are what we eat’. Read more
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