1. Brexit, how might it affect gardeners and the horticulture industry?

    Brexit, a neologism that we have all come to know and maybe despise. But there’s no doubt it will have an impact on all sorts of things, including gardening habits. So what might Brexit mean for gardeners?

    Read more
  2. Gardening – the ultimate green and sustainable occupation. Or is it?

    How sustainable are you in your garden?

    As part of nature, plants themselves are perfectly balanced. They grow organically, they bear fruit and seed and some of this is eaten by animals and humans. Eventually they die and return everything and more back to the soil. Plants in their natural surroundings are in harmony with nature. Plant matter which is farmed or grown for pleasure can eventually be composted and fully re-used. Even water that is used to help plants thrive is recyclable in terms of photosynthesis, evaporation and rain.

    Read more
  3. How realistic are New Year's Resolutions? Here's 5 top tips for success.

    How many people break their New Year's Resolutions?

    Are we setting ourselves up for failure when we make those New Year’s Resolutions? It seems that around 88% of people fail to achieve their goals, and by the end of February a high proportion can’t even remember what they resolved to change in their lives.  Here are the reasons why we do it and five top tips for success:

    Read more
  4. A tale about Twitter, tweets and wild birds

    Twitter, Tweets and wild birds in your garden. Is there a connection?

    We all know that a tweet is a sound coming from a bird, rather than characters originating from a digital device. Right? The majority of the younger generation wouldn’t agree. Tweets are part of Jack Dorsey, Noah Glass, Biz Stone and Evan Williams’ idea for what was originally a ‘short message service’ communications system. A bit like texting, but for groups. In the 12 years or so since Twitter was created, the number of active users has risen to around 336 million each month, making it one of the biggest social networks. This bald eagle (below) would be a wonderful sight to see in the wild!

    Read more
  5. Why you should make the most of an Indian summer

    An Indian summer: what is it and how can you gain maximum benefit from a warm autumn?

    We know the phrase and we hope to get one. Or have we had it already? What on earth is an Indian summer and why do people crave to get one? indian summer, sunshine, october weather, september sunshine, outdoors, make the most, enjoy the garden, perfectplants.co.uk, Sunshine, beautiful colours and warmth. What more could one wish for in autumn? Read more
  6. Plants that can cope with extremes of weather

    Living on the edge: trees and shrubs to suit extremes of weather

    The warm summer weather hasn’t been easy for plants. They have made it perfectly clear that they are suffering. It takes only a little imagination to hear them calling for water as they reach out with wilting foliage fingers. Many have collapsed before the kind man with the watering can has noticed. annuals, plants, flowers, containers, pots, watering, drought, wheelbarrow, robertsbridge, garden, gardening, hosepipe, perfectplants.co.uk, The annual flowers placed lovingly into wheelbarrows outside a railway station look gorgeous, but they are rather labour-intensive to maintain during hot weather. Read more
  7. Keep cool in the garden and seek out the shade

    Head for the shade during sizzling summer days

    There are many ways to try keeping cool during hot, dry and sunny weather. Some are obvious and others, less so. Garden umbrellas are probably the first line of defence. Put up several before the sun rises, and not only will the shade provide a mini-refuge, but the air flow around the umbrella will create a little breeze too. You don’t need a fancy stand, some garden parasols, such as the Eazy Shade from Cave Innovations, come with multi-function clips and clamps so that they can attach to chairs and tables. Read more
  8. 12 ways to plug the summer flowering gap

    Why is your garden bare, dry and jaded? Here's some tips to perk up your plot in July and August

    As much as gardeners tend to love summer (because they can spend all those luscious daylight hours outdoors), the time is approaching when garden beauty starts to dwindle.  Many spaces begin to look barren, with dry soils and parched plants without much in the way of colour. What can you do this month to perk up your plot? Read more
  9. Looking good in summer: 10 hot perennial plants that are drought-tolerant

    Is it fun in the hot sun?

    Is the hot summer all but a dream or will there be more good weather to come? Who knows, in this green and pleasant land, if and when sunshine and warmth will be with us. For most of us, a hot spell is a blessing. But if you were on the continent earlier in the month you would have experienced heatwave Lucifer. It has seen temperatures soar to over 40 degrees C. and caused havoc, including wild fires, drought and even death. The affected countries included Greece, Italy, France, Spain and Croatia, which were all issued with the highest grade ‘red’ warning from European weather hub Meteoalarm.

    Read more
  10. How to deal with slugs, snails and garden pests

    How to deal with slinky, slimy slugs and other garden pests

    Have you planted out your bedding or put out your hanging baskets yet? The recent cold snap might have had its wicked way with anyone who was a little premature with their planting. But it’s certainly been a tempting time, with temperatures having already reached over 25 degrees celsius in the south east. It’s been largely dry and warm this spring. Too dry for gardeners and for many plants. Although the dry soil does have benefits when it comes to slimy garden pests that like to snack on plants. slugs, garden pests, snails, flowers, spring, summer, nibbling, eating, flowers, garden, pest control Slugs will soon be snacking on your prize plants!

    Read more
Page